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How Do I Help My Children Care for Their Teeth and Prevent Cavities?

How Do I Help My Children Care for Their Teeth and Prevent Cavities?

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Good childhood dental care starts with regular visits to the dentist’s office. You can make that first appointment when the first teeth erupt, or at least by the time your child turns one. Why are early visits so important? Recognizing the early signs of tooth decay in children is not always easy. Your dentist can tell you how your little one’s teeth are doing and recommend anything to help protect against decay, like fluoride treatments or dental sealants. Also, it doesn’t hurt to get a few oral care pointers from a dental professional. Don’t be afraid to ask questions that could help you take better care of your child’s teeth.

Teaching your child proper oral care at a young age is an investment in his or her health that will pay lifelong dividends. You can start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued. And anything that makes taking care of teeth fun, like brushing along with your child or letting them choose their own toothbrush, encourages proper oral care.

To help your children protect their teeth and gums and greatly reduce their risk of getting cavities, teach them to follow these simple steps:

  • Brush twice a day with an ADA — accepted fluoride toothpaste to remove plaque-the sticky film on teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay.
  • Floss daily to remove plaque from between your teeth and under the gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a professional cleaning.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet that limits starchy or sugary foods, which produce plaque acids that cause tooth decay. When you do eat these foods, try to eat them with your meal instead of as a snack-the extra saliva produced during a meal helps rinse food from the mouth.
  • Use dental products that contain fluoride, including toothpaste.
  • Make sure that your children’s drinking water is fluoridated. If your water supply; municipal, well or bottled does not contain fluoride, your dentist or paediatrician may prescribe daily fluoride supplements.
  • Take your child to the dentist for regular checkups.

Nutrition For Kids: 5 Healthy Foods That Improve Dental Health

Monday, November 19th, 2018

There are many ways to help your kids have better dental health. You can encourage your kids to brush at least twice a day and floss once a day. You can take them for regular dental checkups every six months. You can make sure they avoid sugary treats and juices. But good nutrition for kids is one of the easiest ways to improve dental health. Here are 5 foods you can add to your child’s diet to help them have healthier teeth, based on recommendations from the American Dental Association (ADA):

1. Apples

Apples are a great addition to your child’s diet. In addition to adding vitamins that are good for their overall health, the process of chewing and eating apples can actually help remove plaque from teeth. Celery and carrots also provide this benefit, so try adding these healthy, crunchy snacks to lunches and snack time.

2. Spinach

Green, leafy veggies like spinach provide a variety of health benefits. Not only are they a great source of iron, but spinach and most other leafy greens are powerful antioxidants. They are also full of beta-carotene, which is needed for keeping tooth enamel strong.

3. Salmon and Other Fish

The Omega-3 fatty acids in fish are well known for improving heart health, but these same foods are great sources of vitamin D, which plays a critical role in keeping teeth and jaw bones strong.

4. Oranges

Oranges and other fruits and veggies are a great source of vitamin C. Without enough vitamin C, kids (and adults) can develop scurvy, which can cause bleeding, swollen gums.

5. Low-Fat Yogurt

Calcium is critical for healthy teeth, and yogurt is a great source of calcium that is fun for kids to eat. Mix a few berries into the yogurt for extra nutrition for kids.

In addition to healthy foods, good brushing and flossing habits, and regular checkups, the ADA recommends chewing sugar-free gum as a way to help minimize plaque. When your kids are old enough to safely have gum, it’s a great option, especially when they can’t brush their teeth right away.

 

 

Src: Shadra Bruce . Nutrition & Oral Health . Basics . Oral Care Center . Colgate.com .  web . 7Sep2015


TOOTH DECAY IN ONTARIO’S CHILDREN

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Tooth decay is an infectious disease — and it is a reality. All children are at risk. The ODA Special Report Tooth Decay in Ontario’s Children: An Ounce of Prevention — A Pound of Cure is a call to action for parents, government and the community — we all need to work together on prevention.

Tooth Decay Facts: Did you know?

  • it is the second most common cause of school absenteeism
  • it is five times more common than asthma in children age 5-17
  • it can be transmitted by sharing a spoon with young children or licking their pacifier
  • it is preventable in almost all cases

Every parent, grandparent and caregiver must read this Special Report.

The time to act is now. We owe it to the children of Ontario.

An ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure.

Ten Tips for Parents

Before your baby has teeth, wipe the gums gently with a clean wet cloth after each feeding.

  1. If your baby sleeps with a bottle or sippy cup at naptime or bedtime, fill it with water only.
  2. If your baby normally falls asleep while feeding, brush his or her teeth before feeding.
  3. Lift your baby’s lip and watch for changes in colour, lines or spots on your child’s teeth as these may be signs of potential problems.
  4. For children from birth to 3 years of age, talk to your dentist about whether fluoridated toothpaste is appropriate for your child and how much should be used.
  5. For children from 3 to 6 years of age, only a small amount (a portion the size of a green pea) of fluoridated toothpaste should be used. Children in this age group should be assisted by an adult when brushing their teeth.
  6. Begin flossing at least once a day when your child’s teeth are touching.
  7. Change your child’s toothbrush every one to three months or immediately after an illness.
  8. To prevent spreading germs that cause tooth decay, do not put anything in your child’s mouth if it has been in your mouth.  Don’t share spoons, cups, food, toothbrushes, etc.
  9. Visit your dentist by the age of one year, or when the first teeth appear.  Take your child to the dentist for regular checkups to make sure there are no problems.

Read the Special Report: “Tooth Decay in Ontario’s Children

Src: oda.on .Ontario Dental Association . 2015 . web . 19Aug2015


Brush, Book, Bed: How to Structure Your Child’s Nighttime Routine

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Brush, Book, Bed, a program of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), has a simple and clear message for parents:

  1. Each night, help your children to brush their teeth.
  2. Read a favorite book (or two)!
  3. Get to bed at a regular time each night.

Having a predictable nighttime routine will help them understand and learn to expect what comes next. Additionally, routines may ease the stress that some families experience at nighttime.

All young children need help with brushing from an adult to make sure a good job is done. When possible, teach children to spit out extra toothpaste, but don’t rinse with water first. The little bit of toothpaste left behind is good for their teeth! Once teeth touch, they can also be flossed. Visit your dentist regularly starting with your child’s first birthday or sooner if there are concerns. Your pediatrician can answer questions about oral health, too. Remember, the last thing to touch the teeth before bed is the toothbrush!

  • As soon as baby is born, you can start good oral health practices. If possible, use a soft washcloth to wipe your baby’s gums after feedings. Remember not to put babies to bed with a bottle filled with milk. And, when it is time to introduce solids, choose healthy foods to reduce the risk of tooth decay.
  • For children under age 3: As soon as you see a tooth in your baby’s mouth you can start to BRUSH! Use a smear (grain of rice) of toothpaste with fluoride 2 times per day.
  • For children ages 3–6: Use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. It is OK to let them practice with the brush, but you get your turn too.

 

After toothbrushing and before bed, find a comfortable spot to sit and read with your child. Spending some time, even just 15 minutes each day, to read aloud together will help improve your child’s language development and social-emotional skills. Make up your own stories, use silly voices, sing songs, and just enjoy this special bonding time with your child. Visit your local library or bookstore, and give your child the opportunity to explore different kinds of books.

Remember, it is never too early to share books with your child. As your child ages, so will the kind of books he or she enjoys. Take a look at these tips for sharing books with your child at each stage of development!

 

Sleep is very important to your child’s health and well-being. In fact, good sleep habits start from birth. However, getting young children to sleep (and to stay asleep) is often one of the most daunting tasks of parenthood. Regardless of your child’s age, the key is to have a predictable series of steps that help him wind down from the day.

Set regular bedtimes (and, if appropriate, nap times) and stick to them. Do not wait for your child to start rubbing his eyes or yawning — that’s probably too late. Putting your child to bed even 15 to 20 minutes earlier can make a big difference and ensure everyone has a good night’s rest.

 

Src: American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2014)


Teething

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Teething is one of the first rituals of life. Although newborns usually have no visible teeth, most baby teeth begin to appear generally about six months after birth. During the first few years of your child’s life, all 20 baby teeth will push through the gums and most children will have their full set of these teeth in place by age 3. A baby’s front four teeth usually erupt or push through the gums at about six months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months. As their teeth erupt, some babies may become fussy, sleepless and irritable, lose their appetite or drool more than usual. Diarrhea, rashes and a fever are not normal symptoms for a teething baby. If your infant has a fever or diarrhea while teething or continues to be cranky and uncomfortable, call your physician.

 

Src: American Dental Association, www.mouthhealthy.org


New research suggests children benefit from early dental visits

Monday, November 19th, 2018

It may benefit children to see a dentist before age 4, a study published in Pediatric Dentistry revealed.

The study, “Do Early Dental Visits Reduce Treatment and Treatment Costs for Children?” which appears in the November/December edition of the journal, offers evidence that early intervention efforts in oral health are both clinically effective and cost effective, according to researchers.

“The takeaway message is early intervention does work,” said Dr. Arthur J. Nowak, lead study author and a professor emeritus at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Iowa.

Researchers examined a year’s worth of billing data for 42,532 children aged 0 to 7 from 20 corporate treatment centers serving children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. About 40 percent of those children were early starters, or had seen a dentist before age 4, while the rest were late starters, having seen a dentist for the first time at or after age 4.

The data showed that late starters had 3.58 more dental procedures done and spent $360 more during eight years of follow up than the early starters. when to first take one’s child to see a dentist,  the ADA recommends occur no later than a child’s first birthday — ideally within six months after the first tooth appears.

 

Src: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2015/article/ADA-04-New-Research-Suggests-Children-Benefit-From-Early-Dental-Visits


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